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RARE & SPECTACULAR CIVIL WAR BROADSIDE WITH AN 8-COLOR IMAGE OF WASHINGTON, FLANKED BY LADY LIBERTY AND LADY JUSTICE, ADVERTISING THE MUSTER OF NEW YORK MEN FOR A UNION ARMY REGIMENT THAT WOULD FIGHT IN VIRGINIA, CERTAINLY ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING AND GRAPHIC EXAMPLES IN EXISTENCE, 1861-62

Web ID: pat-451
Available: In Stock
Frame Size (H x L): 48.75" x 34.75"
Flag Size (H x L): 38" x 23.75"
 
Description:
Most Civil War recruitment broadsides are interesting to look at, not only because of their content, but because of stark, large, black and white text, in several type sets on white parchment. Some have imposing images of eagles, and, on rare occasion, some have a second color, such as scarlet red. This broadside, however, is in a league unto itself. Never before have I seen a huge image of Washington, set between Lady Justice and Lady Liberty (a.k.a. Lady Columbia), on a Civil War recruitment poster. Never before have I seen the use of so many colors; 8 in total, including red, two shades of pink, two shades of blue, green, yellow, and black. These elements are accompanied by both the large scale (approx. 24” x 38”) and the incredible fact that the broadside was printed in attempt to raise a Union regiment by a Virginia title in New York City.

The 1st Virginia Brigade, also known as the Oregon Rifles, represented the efforts of Congressman William Wall to raise a group of men within the City of New York to fight in Virginia. Congressman Wall was an acting Brigade General in the New York State Militia (an honorary title). Like many other politicians, he pursued some manner of direct involvement to seek glory during wartime. Unfortunately for Wall, however, the United States government did not accept the 1st Virginia into service and the brigade failed to muster. The men who signed on were taken into service, but consequently transferred to Company D of the 3rd Maryland Infantry, which was soon after reorganized into Company C of the same unit.

George A. Bulmer, who was to be the mustering officer, saw extensive service during the war. As a private in Company G of the 71st New York State Militia, he saw action at Aquia Creek and at the 1st Bull Run. This unit enlisted for three months and was disbanded. Bulmer was afterwards brevetted Captain and took charge of Company H of the New York Marine Artillery. This unit saw action with General Burnside around New Berne, North Carolina. He was then transferred to Company A of the 14th New York Heavy Artillery, from which he was dismissed by a General Court Martial for disobedience.

The broadside is accompanied by various records regarding the proposed 1st VA Brigade, plus Captain Bulmer’s file from the National Archives with his application for a veteran’s pension. Because this was an obscure unit that never mustered into service as intended, and because Bulmer’s name was misspelled “Bullmer” while serving as a private in the 3-month, 71st NYSM, proper research of the broadside proved a challenging task. My thanks to researcher Bill Floyd for his assistance in assembling the historical background.

Provenance: Ex-Norm Flayderman, from his personal collection.

Mounting: This is a sandwich-mount between 100% cotton and u.v. protective plexiglas. The frame is a black-painted, hand-gilded and distressed Italian molding.
   
Collector Level: Flags for the truest Patriots. My best offerings
Flag Type:
Star Count:
Earliest Date of Origin: 1861
Latest Date of Origin: 1862
State/Affiliation: Virginia
War Association: 1861-1865 Civil War
Price: Please call (717) 676-0545 or (717) 502-1281
E-mail: info@jeffbridgman.com


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